Information

2016 Winter Lecture Series

 

Airborne Geophysical Mapping of Sangre de Cristo Range Front Structure at Great Sand Dunes National Park

Gravity survey composite

by Ben Drenth, Ph. D.

Research Geophysicist, USGS

 

7 PM, Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Room 130 Porter Hall

Adams State University

 

Tectonically active faults that bound the Sangre de Cristo Mountains range front are in many places obscured from direct observation by sedimentary cover. Airborne geophysical methods, particularly those related to aeromagnetic data, are relatively cheap and effective tools to map these concealed faults. However, the dunefield at Great Sand Dunes National Park presents several unique difficulties for this type of work. This talk will describe the novel use of airborne gravity gradient data, in conjunction with other geophysical and geologic data, to map the subsurface configuration of faults at the Park.

About the Speaker

Benjamin J. Drenth received a B.Sc. (2003) in geological engineering from Michigan Technological University, a M.Sc. (2005) in geophysics from the University of Texas at El Paso, and a Ph.D. (2009) in geophysics from the University of Oklahoma. He has worked with the U.S. Geological Survey since 2003, and since June 2009 has worked as a research geophysicist. His research interests involve the geologic interpretation of magnetic and gravity data geophysical data.

The Colorado Field Institute is a nonprofit corporation organized in 2005 to promote greater stewardship of the natural and cultural resources within the San Luis Valley. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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